45 results found for: Salerno (Landings)

Search results for: Salerno (Landings)

Found 45 matches.

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CROSLEY, R Michael (#234)

…which to grab his life jacket from the aircrews’ briefing room before she rolled over and sank. He quickly joined 800 Naval Air Squadron, flying from the escort carrier Biter during Operation Torch, the Allied landings in North Africa. On November 8 he shot down two Vichy French fighters in…

FRASER-HARRIS, Alexander B (#218)

…back into the fuselage, with the result that more Seafires were lost in hard landings than enemy action. But Fraser-Harris demonstrated the aircraft’s effectiveness as a low-level fighter. During Operation Torch, the Allied landings in North Africa, his squadron shot down three aircraft and destroyed 20 others on the ground….

LOATS, Norman (#300)

…sailed to join Carrier Support Group 2, which was staging in the Marshalls to support the invasion of the Marianas. The Gambier Bay supported the landings at Saipan in June, and then Guam in August and at Southern Palaus in September before joining the Escort Carrier Task Unit off Leyte…

MITCHELL, Raymond (#155)

…Invasion, Salerno Beachhead, D-Day Sword Beach, Walcheren & beyond. Signed in memory of his RAF Sgt Pilot brother, Rex, killed in action. From Newcastle upon Tyne & educated at Heaton Grammar School, after his eldest brother, Rex, was killed (as a Sgt Pilot on early Coastal Command Hudsons, as 220…

STRONG, Albert (#231)

…ALGIERS, BONE & BOUGIE for some time before his landing at SALERNO. This lightly built, cheerful and chirpy 5th LIGHT FIELD AMBULANCE DRIVER, then DRIVER Titch STRONG, rapidly became a mascot for the tall lst Bn SCOTS GUARDS soldiers who had come through ANZIO. Titch joined up with them after…

GILLARD, George (#274)

…successors to the BBC’s first war correspondent, Richard Dimbleby, he was able to report the successes beyond El Alamein from further forward and by his reporting gained the trust of the front line soldiers, staff and General Montgomery. Frank Gillard remained with the Eighth Army to cover the later landings

MACLENNAN, Ian R (#128)

…Focke Wulf 190 off Calais. Shortly afterwards he left for Malta, where he joined No 1435 Flight. After returning from Malta and a period of rest in Canada, MacLennan joined No 443 (RCAF) Squadron as a flight commander. On June 7 1944, whilst covering the D-Day landings, he was on…

QUILL, Claire (#185)

…captured German aircraft at Farnborough Fleet Air Arm In January 1943 Quill was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire. From November 1943 to April 1944 he served with the Fleet Air Arm, as a lieutenant commander, helping to develop better carrier-deck-landings with the Supermarine Seafire, the…

FENNESSY, Edward (#54)

…since he was not privy to the plans for the real landings. He was briefly detained by provost marshals for breach of security, until he convinced them that his work was no more than a hypothetical concept. He was then “bigoted” – taken into the top-secret Overlord planning process –…

JOHNSON, James E (#21)

…1942 diary – which not even I had ever seen. 1942 is, in fact, a very interesting year in the air war over northern Europe, what with the FW190’s superiority over the Spitfire Mk V, the ‘Channel Dash’, the disastrous Dieppe landings and the Americans making their first daylight raids…

HOWARD, John (#91)

Alan Pollock’s Rough Notes: A work in progress – the fuller biographies will emerge in due course: please sign up to the Newsletter (bottom of the page) and we’ll let you know when we’ve done more justice in writing up our extraordinary signatories. Leader of the glider-borne Normandy Landings assault…

FOSTER, Bill (#265)

…the Turks in the Middle East in Dec 1916. His war service though does not just incorporate here the role of his unit during the BATTLE of BRITAIN in 1940 and the BLITZ of 1940-1941 but their subsequent move out to join the Desert EIGHTH ARMY right through to SALERNO….

ROBINSON, Albert (#261)

…for TORCH (Bizerta & Philippeville), minelaying with TEVIOT BANK from MALTA Apr-Aug44, SARDINIA. MOTOR TORPEDO BOATS until HMS VALIANT Sep44-Jun46 (VENGEANCE, CHAPLET, CHEVRON & MALTA DOCKYARD 1951-53 postwar)WW2 PENELOPE Rattle Honours; NORWAY 1940, MALTA CONVOYS 1941-42. MEDITERRANEAN 1941-42-43, BATTLE of SIRTE 1942, SICILY, SALERNO and AEGEAN 1943 and ANZIO 1944…

DAVIES, Jeff (#213)

…of No. 39 SQN BLENHEIMS and MARYLANDS, before special training to join the newly formed No.3232 SERVICING COMMANDO UNIT in the MIDDLE EAST, MALTA SICILY & ITALY, where, as first SCU in, they landed at REGGIO 4 Sep 1943 at 0715hrs, soon to service SPITFIRES & USAAF WARHAWKS at SALERNO

ALDRIDGE, James (#200)

…DIVISION and its fine record in TWO WORLD WARS, here the NORTH AFRICAN DESERT CAMPAIGN after El Alamein, into SICILY (at times with 5th HAMPSHIRE REGT) and SALERNO (35 went into the CATANIA battle with him and only 5 came back) then to UK for NORTH WEST EUROPE, landing D+1…

BRIDGE, John (#154)

…waterline. His longest dive during the action lasted twenty hours. He served as a naval bomb safety officer during the Normandy landings of June 1944, defusing many bombs, mines, and shells. He cleared mines in the river Scheldt and various harbour basins in September of that year. He was then…

RICE, FC (#253)

…of the MEDITERRANEAN by Planet News, on board and behind their large Jolly Roger tally flag, on 22 Sep 1943, was one of the war’s famous photos. BEACH MARKING was undertaken, as spot on “Beacons”, for both the TORCH NORTH AFRICAN and HUSKY SICILY INVASION LANDINGS (briefing at Bizerta), the…

PALLOT, Peter (#304)

…before Christmas, 1945 after that period of two and a half years mostly afloat. Once much earlier his vessel had to be towed into Malta and there saw the tail end of the siege, before seeing Rodney and Nelson on their way to support landings. He would be involved in…

SUTTON, Thomas A (#308)

…(Tank) often going round the Clyde and coast to Jura, one of the places where they had beaches suitable for practising their landings on. The all important drill was to learn to drop the anchor on the beach in different conditions and then tow yourself off by hauling on the…

WATKINS, Tasker (#256)

…Ross, arriving there in late June 1944, a few weeks after the initial D-Day landings. The division participated in a number of engagements, such as the Second Battle of the Odon, and, in August, the Battle of the Falaise Pocket. By mid-August Watkins, commanding “B” Company in his battalion, which…

BRITTON, Arthur W (#305)

…the airlifting of entire divisions, aerial re-supply, landings by glider, casualty evacuation from small jungle airstrips and the deployment of landing craft in support of sea borne invasions and river patrols. The country and its climate were the enemy of both sides. Disease and infection could and did decimate armies…

LAKIN, Barklie (#233)

…the MEDITERRANEAN by Planet News, on board and behind their large Jolly Roger tally flag, on 22Sep43, was one of the war’s famous photos. BEACH MARKING was undertaken, as spot on “Beacons”, for both the TORCH NORTH AFRICAN and HUSKY SICILY INVASION LANDINGS (briefing at Bizerta), the Submarine being used…

MAX, Roy (#289)

…was eventually withdrawn from long-range bombing operations, and Max and his crews flew mining sorties and parachute drops to resistance groups. After converting to the Lancaster and flying a few more operations in support of the impending D-Day landings, his tour ended in May 1944, when he was awarded the…

BEAMONT, Roland Prosper ‘Bee’ (#8)

…was waiting to enforce the forthcoming landings in Normandy. In February 1944 Beamont returned to operational flying as leader of No 150, the first Tempest wing comprising Nos 3, 56 and 486 squadrons. Hawker Tempest gun camera On June 8, two days after D-Day, he shot down an Me 109…

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