98 results found for: New Zealand

Search results for: New Zealand

Found 98 matches.

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DEERE, Alan C (#49)

…22 William V. Crawford-Crompton New Zealand Royal Air Force 21½ Raymond Brown Hesselyn New Zealand Royal New Zealand Air Force 21½ Evan Mackie New Zealand Royal New Zealand Air Force 20 +3 shared Cobber Kain New Zealand Royal Air Force 17 First RAF fighter ace of WWII Brian Carbury New

WIREMU, Hemi (#210)

…the Aotearoa Maori Club. He enjoys the chance of meeting New Zealanders in his job, and obviously often thinks of home.” —Barbara Ewing. Source: http://teaohou.natlib.govt.nz/journals/teaohou/issue/Mao60TeA/c12.html) About the 28th (Māori) Battalion The 28th (Māori) Battalion was part of the 2nd New Zealand Division, the fighting arm of the 2nd New Zealand

MAX, Roy (#289)

…he and his gunner were wounded, he managed to land on a French airfield. Returning to operations a few days later, he was told that he had been awarded the Croix de Guerre and the news reached his parents and newspapers in New Zealand. In the chaos of the collapsing…

GIBSON, John AA (#197)

…as an air firing instructor, Gibson was posted in New Year 1942 to No 457, a Royal Australian Air Force Spitfire squadron. In May he returned to New Zealand where, attached to the Royal New Zealand Air Force, he trained its newly formed No 15 Squadron in Tonga. Squadron Leader…

SMITH, Irving S (#109)

…the smoke and debris of the preceding attack. Two Mosquitoes and a Typhoon were lost, but 258 prisoners escaped, including Louis Vivant. Smith was born at Invercargill, Southland, New Zealand. He was educated at Seddon memorial technical college, Auckland, and on leaving school became an apprentice coach-painter. In late 1938,…

CHESHIRE, Geoffrey Leonard (#31)

…threat from German V3 Rocket; discussion of question of height of attack; testing of low level marking techniques during attacks on French targets and Munich, Germany, 24/4/1944-25/4/1944; character of squadron; memories of Barnes Wallis, Ralph Cochrane, Harold ‘Micky’ Martin and Les Munro; contribution of New Zealand and Australian contingents in…

MAYBANK, John W (#242)

NEW ZEALAND and COMMONWEALTH contribution to the ROYAL NAVY, here a “Hostilities Only” pilot on CORSAIRS, who joined the BRITISH PACIFIC FLEET after converting on to CORSAIRS in CEYLON, firstly in 1830 SOUADRON. John particularly remembered a strike against an island radar base off FORMOSA and how useful the mix…

KILMARTIN, JI (#35)

…war as a Wing Commander. Another, almost hidden behind his colleagues, is New Zealander Flying Officer WH Stratton (see below), and the last in the line is Flying Officer CD ‘Pussy’ Palmer, born in the USA of British parentage. He later became a Squadron Leader, but was shot down and…

JOHNSON, James E (#21)

…Johnson received command of No 610 (County of Chester), an AuxAF Spitfire squadron based at Ludham, hard by Hickling Broad in Norfolk. The next month, on August 19, 610 flew with New Zealander Jamie Jameson’s No 12 Group Spitfire wing in the air battle over Dieppe, in support of the…

BURN, Michael C (#86)

…and the following September accompanied Dawson to London Airport in The Times’ s Rolls-Royce to see off the new prime minister, Neville Chamberlain, en route to Munich to meet Hitler. The following summer Burn was in Canada and the United States to cover the visit of the new King and…

de CLARENS, Vicomtesse (#161)

…A heroine at the centre of scenes like those immortalised in Jean-Pierre Melville’s iconic film Army of Shadows, Jeannie more recently caught the attention of journalists at the New York Times. The American newspaper published in August 2017 an obituary that pays homage to the spy’s “heroic and momentous achievements”…

REID, William I (#61)

…the West of Scotland Agricultural College. After graduating, he went on a travelling scholarship for six months, studying agriculture in India, Australia, New Zealand, America and Canada. In 1950, he became an agricultural adviser to the MacRobert Trust, Douneside. From 1959 to his retirement in 1981, he was an adviser…

COASTWATCHER (#249)

…INTELLIGENCE by radio, of great use to the AMERICAN PACIFIC FORCES on enemy AIR, NAVAL & GROUND movement, sometimes having to move hides, always vulnerable to betrayal or discovery by Japanese occupation forces; for all those AUSTRALIAN NEW ZEALAND, BRITISH, DUTCH and ALLIED COASTWATCHERS, particularly those killed in the war,…

MANTLE, W Eric (#189)

…the JAPANESE PEOPLE at HIROSHIMA after the atomic bomb. In the eerie silence of Hiroshima’s ruins, Eric met Kyoshi Tanimoto, also a METHODIST PASTOR, and helped via the RAF CHURCH IWAKUNI plus AUSTRALIAN, NEW ZEALAND and AMERICAN contributions, to repair the Church roof to allow services to begin again in…

LLOYD-OWEN, David (#273)

…David Lloyd-Owen via the LRDG Association David Lloyd Owen was a man of great charm, immaculate appearance (when not on operations) and remarkable skill and endurance. He won the admiration of the members of the LRDG – many of them tough Rhodesians and New Zealanders – not merely for his…

WOOLNOUGH, James A (#230)

…TENTH and FOURTEENTH ARMIES; I CANADIAN, II POLISH, V BRITISH and X BRITISH CORPS with national DIVISIONS with NEW ZEALAND and two INDIAN additions, plus a GREEK MOUNTAIN (3rd) & 43rd GURKHA LORRIED included in two dozen ARMOURED and INFANTRY BRIGADES. JAMES’s Father had been badly wounded at GALLIPOLI and…

HODGES, Lewis (#34)

…directing staff at the staff college at Haifa, returning home in October 1946. He then attended the RAF Flying College and flew a Canberra PR7 in the London to New Zealand air race. Hodges was in the lead — having established a point-to-point record from London to Colombo — when…

PALLOT, Peter (#304)

…into the Adriatic including Yugoslav ports such as Split. In fact one of his biggest near misses was two days before the war ended when the New Zealand Division reached TRIESTE but in too small numbers not to be threatened by the Yugoslav partisans wanting to take the city over….

ZURAKOWSKI, Stanislaw (#169)

…from the south because three separate major assaults on Cassino were necessary, the first by 2nd NZ Corps in February and the second by the 2nd NEW ZEALAND and 4th INDIAN DIVISION in March, followed by the flanking FRENCH CORPS before the final sustained POLISH 2nd CORPS attack began on…

CAREY, Frank R (#27)

…British High Commission in Australia. Carey, who was awarded the US Silver Star and appointed CBE in 1960, retired from the RAF in 1962 and joined Rolls-Royce as its aero division representative in Australia, New Zealand and Fiji, retiring to Britain 12 years later. Before the war he married Kay…

VRACIU, Alexander (#303)

…staff announcer for WOR Radio in New York, interrupted a broadcast of a professional football game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants at the Polo Grounds to read the following bulletin from the United Press news agency: “The Japanese have attacked Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, by air, President [Franklin]…

CROSLEY, R Michael (#234)

‘Once airborne, the Seafire responded with the sensitivity of a polo pony to nearly all our ignorant demands upon it. It behaved in its normal habitat with such unselfish grace and with such rapid response and power, that we knew we were being allowed to fly a thoroughbred. Once we…

ELLISON, Lorna (#174)

…28, and Jan, 26, wrote new wills. Naturally, they remembered their families but the only others mentioned were their English roses. Their incredible bravery is at the centre of much-anticipated new movie Anthropoid with Fifty Shades of Grey’s Jamie Dornan and Peaky Blinders’ Cillian Murphy playing the doomed pair. But…

BABINGTON-SMITH, Constance (#180)

…pursuing another vital brief – watching out for new types of aircraft, especially jets. “Keeping an eye on Peenemünde,” she said, “was a minor task compared to the everlasting watch for new German aircraft.” When Group Captain Frank Whittle, inventor of the jet engine, paid her a visit, he was…

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