37 results found for: Murmansk (Run)

Search results for: Murmansk (Run)

Found 37 matches.

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DUMON, Andrée Antoine (#158)

…kitchen and up on to our roof, but soldiers with guns were already blocking the stairs.” They had finally come for her – as she always knew they would. For the best part of a year, Nadine had been hiding Allied airmen on the run behind enemy lines and secretly…

CALVERT, J Michael (#152)

…Burma in force. He got no thanks in the short run – indeed he was reprimanded for damaging the property of the Burmah Oil Company without permission. He discovered in the long run that he had indeed done a little to hold up the Japanese advance. His casualties were light…

CREW, Edward D (#114)

‘Night fighter ace with an almost uncanny knack in locating the target and attacking it on the first run in’ ‘Air Vice-Marshal Edward Crew, who died on Sunday aged 84, was an ace night fighter pilot and destroyer of V-1 flying bombs; after notching up at least 13 kills, he…

ELKINGTON, JFD (#16)

…the Russians from the Arctic port of Murmansk. He was still only 19 when he joined No 1 Squadron at RAF Northolt in July 1940, during the opening phase of the Battle of Britain. Flying a Hurricane fighter, he shot down a Messerschmitt Bf 109 on August 15. The following…

TAIT, James B (#66)

…the 12,000lb Tallboy bomb, and it was decided that it was the most likely weapon to put Tirpitz out of action. On the night of September 11 Tait led a force of 37 Lancasters to the Russian airfield at Yagodnik, near Murmansk. During the first night, asleep in rudimentary bedding,…

KAGAN, Jack (#311)

…lady living there was too frightened to give him shelter. With options running out Jack made his way back Nowogrodek and sneaked into the camp on a horse-drawn cart. There he found that his toes had become black with frost bite so a dentist amputated his toes with a scalpel….

HODGES, Lewis (#34)

‘When asked what he had missed most whilst on the run for eight months, he responded without hesitation “my pyjamas”. From that moment, he always wore them under his uniform when flying on operations.’ “Air Chief Marshal Sir Lewis Hodges, who died on January 4 2007 aged 88, was one…

BURBRIDGE, Bransome A (#103)

…the night of February 23 1944, during the Luftwaffe’s Operation Steinbeck, known as the “baby blitz”, a series of lightning hit-and-run bombing attacks on southern England. Flying a Mosquito of No 85 Squadron, Skelton gained a contact on his radar set near Beachy Head and directed Burbridge behind an enemy…

CALDER, Benjamin J (#176)

…as the later ANTWERP PORT system, with its AMERICAN, British & Canadian run DOCKS, where he experienced the heavy V-1 bombardment and would see the arrival of President TRUMAN, his CRUISER “AUGUSTA” and the 30 vehicle cavalcade en route to the POTSDAM CONFERENCE. Ben CALDER signs for those vital PORTS…

LEAROYD, Roderick AB (#59)

…of the page) and we’ll let you know when we’ve done more justice in writing up our extraordinary signatories. Recipient of the Victoria Cross. Courageous 12 Aug 1940 attack in five HAMPDENS (2 shot down, 2 hit ahead, on attack run) on Dortmund Ems Aqueduct, became Harris’s BOMBER COMMAND exemplar….

KINCADE, Paul B (#240)

…remembers FIVE different convoys, which had FIVE SHIP losses & one with EIGHT – & the NAVAL ARMED GUARD is now one of the least remembered aspects of WW2) within the UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE, for 13 months in SS Thomas SUMTERr including ARCTIC CONVOYS to MURMANSK with AMMUNITION &…

CURTIS, Lawrence (#260)

…to an airfield near Murmansk to position for an attack against the German battleship Tirpitz, which was sheltering in a fjord in the north of Norway. The attack was thwarted by the ship’s smoke screen. Two months later, when the ship (labelled “The Beast” by Churchill) had moved further south,…

MacLENNAN, Roddie (#184)

…completely abandoned the vessel. Roddie’s lifeboat, with 4 long oars and two men on each oar, could still see the blazing vessel to windward. In the middle of the night they were so nearly run down that they were almost swamped, an oar was touched and they could feel the…

LACEY, James (#7)

…sounded like. In a 1978 BBC interview, he recalled waking up in a hut by the runway as the pilots waited for the phone to ring. “You would have a cup of tea, some breakfast, you would go out to your aircraft, a couple of hundred yards, check the aircraft,…

JONES, Don (#267)

…tactics. The Hurricanes had quite high losses practising and perfecting the ideal anti tank profiles to suit the killing potential of the 40mm guns, particularly in the run up to and after El ALAMEIN. 24 October, 1942 was their most successful day, when 6 Squadron was credited with knocking out…

CURRAN, Samuel (#182)

…magnetron, produced after the initial run of a dozen, is one of the first production series. Eventually, the growing electronics industries of the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada manufactured well over a million magnetrons before the end of the Second World War. The mass-production of the cavity magnetron…

ELLISON, Lorna (#174)

…stalled tram. Suddenly, Heydrich doubled over and staggered to the side of the road in pain. He then collapsed against the railings, holding himself up with one hand. As Gabčík took the opportunity to run, Klein returned from his fruitless chase of Kubiš to help his wounded superior. Heydrich, his…

VRACIU, Alexander (#303)

…in the tight confines of the ship). Returning to the Lexington, Vraciu found that he had used just 360 rounds of ammunition from his Hellcat’s six .50-calibre machine guns—an impressive display of shooting. Vraciu’s luck, however, finally ran out on December 14, 1944, during a strafing run against a Japanese…

ATKINS, George (#3)

…the ground crew is briefly summarised by the Imperial War Museums on their website: As well as carrying out their regular duties, members of the ground crew would be called upon during German raids on their airfields. They towed damaged aircraft away from runways to make room for others to…

COX, John W (#298)

…Tinian for their main strategic bases and, beyond and not quite halfway there to Japan, Iwo Jima, so necessary as emergency landing strips for their long distance runs to targets in Japan 700 miles further north from Iwo and the pilots and technicians for those P-51 Mustang fighters and P-61…

DROBINSKI, Boleslaw H (#19)

…and Polish Air Force since 1940” pleaded Drobinski. “Oh, that doesn’t count” said the official “you came here without permission to land”. Drobinski took up a family invitation to work in an oil business in America. After six years he returned to Britain to help his sick father-in-law to run

CAREY, Frank R (#27)

…June, together with “three similar RAF derelicts”, Carey located an abandoned Bristol Bombay. Obtaining fuel from the French Air Force they filled her up and took off, with Carey manning the rear gun. “Good shots of Royal Air Force fighter pilots scrambling, they run to their aircraft with several shots…

CUNNINGHAM, John (#50)

…was ingested by his engines. Barely off the runway, Cunningham touched down at some 130 mph. The jet shot across a road, colliding with a car and killing four passengers before halting in a field where it caught fire. Cunningham sustained two crushed vertebrae, but none of his passengers were…

DAVID, W Dennis (#18)

…John Lovey, a wholesale clothing and footwear business run by an uncle. As war loomed, he trained with the RAFVR, flying a Blackburn B.2 biplane trainer at the London Air Park. After the fall of France, 87 Squadron re-formed at Church Fenton, near Leeds. In July 1940, it moved to…

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